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About

This Community, Place, Memory project challenges us to look at American and global society as a “world of places” that allows us “to see things differently” when we immerse ourselves in a particular community’s history, memory and understanding of itself. An understanding of distinct places (such as Rochester’s Public Market, Philadelphia’s Textile Corridor, or Silicon Valley’s early chip manufacturing zone) is critical to thinking about a range of contemporary civic matters, from the efficacy of community redevelopment plans to the need for environmental remediation in the urban core.

The project exists at Rochester Institute of Technology, at the intersection of the liberal arts with general education. Students learn the history and current issues of city neighborhoods through exploration of historic images; analysis of primary and secondary source texts; meetings with long-time residents and professionals; and field trips to places in the neighborhood. By partnering with community experts to consider the historical factors and current trends that build the place they call home, students develop an informed perspective on the social, economic and political forces that have influenced the shape of a community. The partnerships result in these exhibits and an invitation for the public’s continued contribution.

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About

This Community, Place, Memory project challenges us to look at American and global society as a “world of places” that allows us “to see things differently” when we immerse ourselves in a particular community’s history, memory and understanding of itself. An understanding of distinct places (such as Rochester’s Public Market, Philadelphia’s Textile Corridor, or Silicon Valley’s early chip manufacturing zone) is critical to thinking about a range of contemporary civic matters, from the efficacy of community redevelopment plans to the need for environmental remediation in the urban core.

The project exists at Rochester Institute of Technology, at the intersection of the liberal arts with general education. Students learn the history and current issues of city neighborhoods through exploration of historic images; analysis of primary and secondary source texts; meetings with long-time residents and professionals; and field trips to places in the neighborhood. By partnering with community experts to consider the historical factors and current trends that build the place they call home, students develop an informed perspective on the social, economic and political forces that have influenced the shape of a community. The partnerships result in these exhibits and an invitation for the public’s continued contribution.

Read more >>